Save Your Bacon

The following is from Viking marketer Timo Jappinen in Sweden.
No. That’s not in South Carolina. It’s in Scandinavia, just in case you didn’t know.
They are “7 Simple Low-Cost Marketing Tips to Save Your Bacon.”
You can’t do much about the government, Congress or the White House. They are hopeless riggers of the economy, generally in their favor, not ours.
The only economy you should worry about is your own.
The good news: Those who start getting things right during the recession come out stronger than those who sit on their hands.
Here are a few firms started in the great depression of the 1930′s: Audi, Duracell, Fisher-Price, Westin Hotels, Clairol, Revlon, Lego, Nissan and Walt Disney.
Why did they survive? Because they were good at marketing.
Good marketing isn’t expensive marketing.
It’s means smart marketing. So here are 7 low-cost marketing tips for you.
1. Put a top priority on collecting prospect contacts.
That’s info on anyone you think might be likely to buy from you – now or later
The great business thinker Peter Drucker once said “There is only one profit center in business. It is your customer.”
Don’t settle for a website or an ad that simply lists a few benefits of doing business with you.
Offer something free – a report, a booklet or a special deal – so your prospect has to give you his or her contact information.
Then you can follow them up until they buy . . . or die.
Now you have more than one shot to sell to them.
2. Don’t be shy. Go after the money.
In our marketing agency, we have learned that “the money is in the list.” That’s the list of prospects I was talking about – but also, and even more valuable, your list of clients.
Talk to them. It is 3 to 8 times easier to sell to an existing client than to someone who is not.
They are your best source of profit.
And don’t just talk to them once a month or once a year.
Talk to them as often as you can think of something helpful or interesting to say. The more often you communicate, the more you sell.
My partner once asked a big client how long he followed up with people?
“Until they give in.” said the marketing director.
He measured everything. He knew it could be six months, a year, even five years before they cloise the first sale. The second and third sales depend on how well you perform.
 
3. Your client buys when he wants to . . . not when you want him to.
Just because your prospect didn’t buy immediately or after a few sales calls or emails, it doesn’t mean they are not interested. McGraw-Hill research revealed that on average a salesman makes the sale after the fifth call.
When we were running our own executived search service, we found that it took a minimum of 7 calls to get an appointment and 7 appointments to get a search assignment. And that was calling a well-researched, warm list of prospects.
You can sell a complex, expensive product directly by phone or on the web with well-written letters and emails . . . working with good personal selling skills and a reheased script that does not sound like you’re reading it.
I got one such call the other day and I stopped the caller on the second sentence.
“Honey,” I said in my most supportive tone of voice, “please don’t read it to me.”
Does it sound like that?” she said, surprised by my response.
“It does,” I assured her. “What you must do is rehearse it until you can say it to your husband, your kids, your dog and in your sleep. Then it becomes you.”
Ttarget the right people and talk or write about what interests them. Contrary to ill-informed belief, long copy almost invariably beats short copy. As any top salesman will tell you the more you share and the more you question your prospects, the more they will buy.
Tmo said one of his clients sells a product starting at $85,000. The average sale is $170,000.
They were using a one-page sales letter. He rewrote and expanded it to four pages.
Response tripled and sales doubled.
4. Don’t limit your marketing to the internet.
Google Adwords expert Perry Marshall started his career as a sales manager in a small unknown U.S. software company.
After months of struggle, he decided to offer events teaching prospects to use their software to improve their business. They even charged to attend.
Their yearly sales leaped from less than $1 million to $3 million dollars in three years.
Imagine: Prospects pay to see you. It beats cold calling. And works better.
You have an array of marketing media. Test the ones that your Ideal Clients consume to determine which produce the highest sales of your most profitable products.
5. Sales and profits matter more than getting capital.
If you follow startups, you may sometimes get an idea that the purpose of a new company is to get millions from venture capitalists before you have sold or done anything.
Many will tell you that’s the way to success. What they don’t tell you is that easy money corrupts. It makes you lazy.
IBM’s maxim is still true today: “Nothing happens until something is sold.”
Having a profitable business makes you stronger when you negotiate with the money sharks who eat innocent dolphins like you for a living.
 
6. It’s smart to copy your competition. 
Just do it better than they do it and give your products and service greater value.
Sam Walton, founder of Walmart, confessed that he didn’t really invent anything nor tried to.
Instead he went to the cheapest source of tested business ideas, to the competitor across the street and copied shamelessly. It may not to be the sexiest thing to do, but Walmart is doing pretty well, don’t you think?
7. Testing is the right answer to any marketing problem.
It’s easier, cheaper and faster to do a split test than to argue in endless meetings. Should you lower or raise prices? A free trial or money back guarantee? Webinars or live seminars?
Let your customers decide – by buying. Research can tell you what people think and have done but not what they are going to.
Did you know that consumer research suggested Marlboro Man ad campaign would bomb?
But Leo Burnett, father of the agency that created it, knew better: “To hell with the research. Run it.” And Marlboro became the best selling cigarette brand in the world.

 

Winners’ Circle Marketing Magic

Selecting Your Marketing Media
 
Consider the best ways to reach your Ideal Clients.
These are the ones who buy big ticket items from you.
They are your highest profit clients.
They are the one who not only keep you in business.
They will send your kids to college.
Pay off your mortgage. Send you on that world cruise.
What media do they use to make buying decisions?
You have got to know that. 
How do you do it?
You ask a few of them. They will tell you.
 
You may be able to reach them:
• In their local newspaper — my favorite.
• In a local or regional magazine.
• Online at your web site — if you send them there.
• With a freebie or irresistible email offer from you.
• With social media messaging.
• Over the air or by cable.
• By direct mail or outdoor advertising.
• With promotional advertising.
 
For example, I’ve found what works for me.
I attract older, affluent boomers with newspapers. 
They tell me they trust and read local papers.
My second choice is a direct mail campaign.
For this, I use email and snail mail.
To reach them I use a list of affluent local people.
Who you sell to may be entirely different.
You have to find out which media works for you.
 
Advertising is our best, least expensive sales force.
It’s like having several hundred sales people.
It’s like having them calling prospects for you.
I could not afford a huge sales staff. Ads do it for me.
My advertising has one mission and one mission only.
It’s to make sales for me and my business. 
It is not to be catchy, cute or clever. It is not to build  brand.
Client satisfaction builds loyalty. Loyalty builds your brand.
 
Recommended Reading
My new Special Report will attract your best clients.
It’s called “Seduction Marketing.”
For a complimentary copy email me.
In the subject line put: “Seduction Marketing.”
It’s absolutely free. No strings attached.
 
Next: Why you must make the first sale
Want to share this with a friend? Be my guest.
We only ask that you tell them where it came from.
Invite them to send me their email address.
They can reach me at JerryBellune@yahoo.com
I’ll email this strategy letter to them each week.

Jerry Bellune’s Marketing Magic

Creating Your Marketing Message
Crafting advertising copy is harder than it looks.
Planning a marketing campaign is equally complex.
You need to start by identifying your target.
These are your Ideal, Most-Profitable Clients.
• What’s their age and income range?
This determines their preferences in your offers.
It also determines if they can afford your very best.
• Where so they live and how do they live?
Do they live in the better neighborhoods?
Do they order in person, by phone or online?
Are they penny pinchers or lavish spenders?
• Who they will be buying for?
If for themselves, what can you expect they’ll spend?
If for a loved one, will they be willing to spend more?
If for grandchildren, does the price even matter?
 
Your message must do something vital for them.
What is it you’ve got that they crave to:
• Relieve their aches and pains.
• Solve their vexing headaches and problems.
• Achieve their goals, especially in B2B offers.
• Realize their fondest wishes and dreams.
 
For example, your message may be for pain relief.
This could be something as simple as aspirin.
Or something as complex as sedation dentistry.
They may fear the dentist but have acute jaw pain.
Your message explains how they will:
• Go gently to sleep during the procedure.
• Awaken after the pain has been alleviated.
 
You may offer them the dream of a lifetime.
• It may be to send their child to an expensive college.
• It may be to buy an upscale home in the suburbs.
• It may be to acquire a second home at the beach.
• It may be to take time for a trip around the world.
Whatever it is, make it about them, never about you.
Inexperience marketers make that mistake.
Always appeal to what they want, not what you want.
 
Recommended Reading
My new Special Report will attract your best clients.
It’s called “Seduction Marketing.”
For a complimentary copy email me.
In the subject line put: “Seduction Marketing.”
It’s absolutely free. No strings attached.
Next: Selecting Your Marketing Media.

Jerry Bellune’s Marketing Magic

Marketing’s First Magic Leg

How do million­dollar marketers do it?
They practice unorthodox strategies and tactics.
They invest a lot of time in planning.
They understand who their target market is.
Those are their ideal, most profitable clients.
They know the media their clients consume.
They shape messages to appeal to those clients.
Their messages meet at least one of three tests:
• They ease clients’ pains and solve their problems.
• They speed them toward achieving their goals.
• They reward their fantasies and dreams.
 
Now here’s the best secret, You can do this, too.
But you must act on what I show you.
Get out a pad and pencil because you’ll need them.
Don’t have time right now? That’s OK.
Make a note to come back to this when you’re ready.
Here’s my first question for you to consider:
Do you think that if you advertise they will come?
Attracting ideal clients is far more strategic than that.
And retaining them is the most strategic of all.
Marketing is a 3­legged stool.
Your Market. Your Message. Your Media.
Hang on. It’s not rocket science.
I’ll show you the three easy steps you’ll need.
They are guaranteed to attract and retain ideal clients.
 
The Market is your Ideal Client or Patient.
Those are the people you want to attract and retain.
For example: Your client should value higher quality.
They know they will pay more for it.
But it will last longer with lower maintenance costs.
Over it’s lifetime, it will save them money.
It will make them look and feel better.
The money they spend with you is a wise investment.
The higher price will actually be cheaper.
Make notes now about who your ideal client is:
Their age, desires, gender, income, lifestyle and needs.
Paint a clear picture of who you want to attract.
 
Recommended Reading
My new Special Report will help you in sales.
It will help those you are teaching to sell.
For a complimentary copy email me.
In the subject line put: “Marketing Magic.”
It’s absolutely free. No strings attached.
Next: Creating your Marketing Message.
 
Want to share this with a friend? Be my guest.
We only ask that you tell them where it came from.
Invite them to send me their email address.
They can reach me at JerryBellune@yahoo.com
I’ll email this strategy letter to them each week.

XXX-Rated Business Strategies

The Art of Seduction in Sales

 This is not advice from Hugh Hefner or Dear Abby.

It is a strategy that will attract and retain clients.

You can call it what you like. Lets call it seduction.

 
Ever wonder what sales professionals do?
It’s simple. They look and act like professionals.
But looking and acting is a bit more complicated.
Leading department stores hire attractive women.
They know that customers prefer to buy from them.
They must act like pros, not just look like ones.
 
Pros aren’t hookers. They are people who:
• Dress for success and act professionally.
• Believe in themselves and what they have to offer.
• Exude confidence that comforts buyers’ fears.
• Establish rapport and win buyers’ confidence.
This is the secret to successful persuasion in sales.
 
The Mayflower Madam taught her girls to do it.
Sydney Barrows ran an exclusive escort service.
Her clients were wealthy and successful men.
She taught her girls to dress and act like real ladies.
This allowed them to command the clients’ respect.
It also helped them out of occasional trouble.
Sydney taught them what to do to:
• Make the client comfortable but respectful.
• If the client made them wary or uncomfortable.
 
She taught them what she had learned at home.
Dress as if your grandfather was taking you to dinner.
Let clients treat you like a lady by acting like one.
Be a good listener. Ask intelligent questions.
Read newspapers and magazines. Don’t be a dunce.
 
In 30 years in sales, we have hired mostly women.
We have no bias against men. But women do better.
They develop what I call “the art of seduction.”
They help people make good buying decisions.
Men only tend to want to close the sale.
 
Recommended reading
All of us can learn from Sydney Barrows’ books:
“The Mayflower Madam” tells how she did it.
“Uncensored Sales Strategies” tells how you can, too.
Both are available at Amazon or your bookseller.
More about Sydney at sydneybarrows.com
 
Next: The Arts of Persuasion in Sales
 
Want to share this with a friend? Be my guest.
We only ask that you tell them where it came from.
Invite them to send me their email address.
They can reach me at JerryBellune@yahoo.com
I’ll email this strategy letter to them each week.

XXX-Rated Business Strategies

How to attract your Ideal Clients with prices others won’t pay

The Mayflower Madam had an epiphany.
Her buyers wanted escorts who were extra special.
And they were willing to pay for the privilege.
That led to her to a profitable discovery.
She could charge premium prices.
She ran the premiere escort service in New York.
 
Sydney Biddle Barrows’ story is a page turner.
She put herself through college. No one else would.
She was fired for refusing a kickback scheme.
She went to work answering phones for a pimp.
She was turned off by his exploitation of his workers.
She saw how much money her boss was making.
She told herself she could do better than him.
She fantasized owning her own escort service.
She and her friend Lucy opened their own service.
Her interviews were tough auditions.
Applicants were told how to dress for the audition:
“As if your grandfather is taking you to lunch at 21.”
She wanted only the very best to work for her.
She taught and improved her young ladies’ taste.
She took them to Saks and Macy’s for their clothes.
She named her service Cachet as in “prestigious.”
That weeded out men who couldn’t pronounce it.
Her girls had to read Time and Newsweek.
That way they could talk intelligently with the clients.
They could only drink wine. And in small amounts.
They wore elegant dresses and risqué underwear.
They learned how to be treated as ladies.
Let the clients take your coat . . . respectfully.
Act so that they will respect you as a person.
At clients’ request, she added a pricier option.
She called it Finesse as in “refined delicacy.”
Clients paid top dollar for the entire experience.
Can you apply these principles to your business?
Who you hire? How you train them? How they look?
How they work with your clients and prospects?
Recommended reading
This is just a sample of Sydney Barrows’ ideas.
I recommend two of her books to you:
“The Mayflower Madam” tells how she did it.
“Uncensored Sales Strategies” tells how you can, too.
Both are available at Amazon or your bookseller.
More about Sydney at sydneybarrows.com
Next: The choreography of sales
Want to share this with a friend? Be my guest.
We only ask that you tell them where it came from.
Invite them to send me their email address.
They can reach me at JerryBellune@yahoo.com
I’ll email this strategy letter to them each week.