Save time and get more done

Many business owners boast that they have an open door policy. That’s great – if they have nothing else to do. But for many, it is a mistake. They should encourage their people to seize the initiative and solve problems they encounter themselves.
Multiple studies have found that interruptions cause tasks to take 30% longer or more. Many of those tasks are ones that only you as the boss can and should do.
One solution to keep them from coming to you with every 5-cent problem is to teach them to be self-reliant and take responsibility for their work. When they come to you, ask them what they consider the best solution. If you agree, congratulate them and ask them to take care of it. Let them know your confidence in them is growing.
An easy way to improve your productivity 30% is to close your door. You can even post a sign: “Please call back at 3 pm.”
Your employees will get the message and learn that they can talk with you later.
Most of us do NOT have to be on the premises all day every day. We can work part-time at home with few interruptions.
You will get more done and make more time for your family and personal projects.
We discuss this in a new book, “Maverick Entrepreneurs’ Million Dollar Strategies.”
For a $20 personally autographed copy, contact us at 803-359-7633 or email JerryBellune@yahoo.com.
Copyright 2019, The Bellune Co., Inc.

How successful people use time

To succeed in sales, map out your schedule for the day, your goals and to-dos.
The morning is a good time as it is one of the only quiet times you will have, says advertising sales manager Linda Sauls.
Plan each week in advance. You will use your time more effectively and efficiently.
To plan your week, Linda advises:
• Consult your Daily Sales Plan and Call Record. This should include prospects, their organization, phone/email, the purpose of your call, the result and your next action.
• Refer to your monthly objectives to determine which marketing and sales activities have highest priority.
• Review your Master Plan. See how well you are meeting your overall goals and what to do to improve performance.
• Write sales-producing emails and snail mail letters, depending on the prospect.
Write using a few basic rules:
• Keep them short and simple. Shorter letters are more likely to be read completely. A 1-page letter is best.
• Write the way you speak. Pay attention to your grammar and spelling. Write in a friendly, sincere and warm writing style.
• Use bullets for specific points.
Linda explains these steps and more in a new book “Maverick Entrepreneurs’ Million Dollar Strategies.” Autographed copies are available for $20 by calling Katie or Jewel at 803-359-7633.
Copyright 2018, The Bellune Co., Inc.

The iceberg approach to marketing

Much of effective marketing is like the submerged part of an iceberg — invisible but powerful and important. For example:
Business strategist Ann Elliott took a successful business leader’s advice to write a newsletter for her clients and prospects. He said it would provide value for them and establish her as an authority and someone worth listening to.
Ann dragged her feet for months.
At an association conference presentation, she stepped out on a limb and offered to send her new electronic newsletter to the audience. To become a subscriber, all they had to do was give her their name and email address.
As the clipboards moved through the audience, she promised to send them the inaugural issue. In 2006, she published the first issue of “The Leadership Strategist.” It was a concise commentary on leadership with strategies, insights and tips for running a business on purpose.
A subscription is available at www.berkanacompany.com with a complimentary diagnostic tool, “Find 10 Surprising Reasons Your Business Has Profit Leaks.”
Ann shows other strategies in a new book, “Maverick Entrepreneurs’ Million Dollar Strategies” coming next month.
For advance orders, call 803-359-7633

Does your advertising make money?

The secrets of advertising that works

Brand marketing is pushed on business owners and professionals by many marketing and advertising companies.
This kind of advertising emphasizes the owner or the professional, their credentials and services they provide. Little of it is about the prospects’ problems, writes successful dentist Greg Wych in “Maverick Entrepreneurs’ Million Dollar Strategies.”
This advertising is usually “pretty” and plays to the ego of the professional, not the needs of or benefits to the prospect.
Although the transaction size can be large, especially in sedation or cosmetic dentistry, this type of advertising has a poor return on investment.
Wych began to study and use direct response and lead generation advertising through the ideas of Dan Kennedy.
This type of advertising may look “ugly.”
No white space. No pictures of the doctor.  No mundane lists of services.
Dan Kennedy preaches the use of the right media to deliver a message that cannot be ignored.  Most importantly, the results must be measurable, Kennedy says.
If you don’t know which ads bring you business, you may be wasting your money.
Wych and 10 other entrepreneurs reveal their secrets in “Maverick Entrepreneurs’ Million Dollar Strategies” which will be published next month.
To reserve your copy, call 803-359-7633.

They could eat you for lunch

Avoid the most costly mistake in business
Eastman Kodak made it. You could, too.
When technology changes industries, businesses that adapt will thrive.
Kodak erred in doing the same old thing and lost a fortune to digital cameras.
You may not know this but Kodak brass filed a patent for one of the first digital cameras in 1977. But they made too much money on film to introduce it.
Kodak continued its traditional ways even as the market was going digital. When it finally woke up, it was too late. Kodak couldn’t compete with digital camera makers who had been doing it for years.
This was a repeat of the error of the buggy whip makers as Henry Ford and others were driving buggies out of business.
Smart buggy makers put engines in their products and joined the trend. Those who didn’t adapt went out of business.
You see this in the media today. Google, Facebook and other social media are gaining ad revenue steadily. This is costing magazines, newspapers, radio, outdoor and TV billions of dollars in lost revenue. It has hurt book publishers and book stores, too.
Smart media people are joining, not ignoring or fighting technology.
Printed books, magazines and newspapers aren’t going away. Yet publishing electronically will gain them more readers.
For a complimentary digital copy of my new eBook “Uncover Your Inner Sales Genius,” email me at JerryBellune@yahoo.com