Trends to help – or hurt -your business

Alert business owners and entrepreneurs need to be aware of new consumer trends that may help – or hurt – their business.

A local ad agency survey found that some behavioral changes may be long-lasting. While 92% of consumers wanted to go out to eat, 67% planned to cook more at home and 41% planned to order take-out once the covid-19 crisis subsides.

67% missed going to movies but 56% were more likely to stream movies at home.

Bringing manufacturing back to the US, especially in critical products such as drugs and technology, could have positive impacts on South Carolina. Low labor costs and lack of union resistance to modern production methods will make right-to-work states appealing to manufacturers.

Consumers who rarely if ever bought products online have been forced to turn to the internet. Now that they realize how convenient it is for many products, they are expected to continue to buy there. As for shopping in women’s fashions, they can watch shopping channels and buy there,

We share such ideas in “Maverick Entrepreneurs’ Million Dollar Strategies.” For a $20 personally autographed copy, contact us at 803-331-6695.

Do you see other trends? Please let me know at JerryBellune@yahoo.com

Next: More trends that could help or hurt your business’s bottom line.

Copyright 2020, The Bellune Co., Inc.

Sell stories to more readers

To attract readers, carefully choose your headline and lead sentence words.
Advertising copywriters like legendary Claude Hopkins measured response.
This helped them appeal to people who want or need what they offer.
The same principle holds true to news and sports writing.
To attract readers, entice them with your words.
The Washington Post has pulled this off by combining serious journalism with stories that appeal to the heart. A couple of examples:Orphaned boy moved to his grandparents’ home
Now the homeowners association would kick him out

After his parents died, teenager Collin Clabaugh moved to Prescott, Ariz., to live with his grandparents.

Police thought her husband died from a fall
Then his wife admitted to poisoning him

Lana Sue Clayton claimed that she didn’t mean to kill her husband when she poisoned his drinking water.
The Post uses classic 2-sentence headlines and alluring lead sentences. 
You can see why this technique attracts readers.

Here are a couple of examples of how we can do this.
There’s nothing wrong with the original headline and lead on our site.

The Original:

$1 million lottery ticket sold in Lexington
A Lexington Powerball player is holding a $1 million ticket. It was bought at the Stop N Shop at 1104 N. Lake Dr. in Lexington for Wednesday night’s drawing.
Read more

The Revised:

Do you have the $1 million lottery ticket?
Read on, you may be holding it

The state lottery winning $1 million ticket was bought at the Stop N Shop at 1104 N. Lake Dr. in Lexington for Wednesday night’s drawing.
 Check your ticket as the winning numbers are… 
Read more

The Original:

Dutch Fork hands Lexington boys 1st loss
Gilbert boys win 1st game of season

A 9-game winning streak in Region 5-5A ended Tuesday in Irmo for the Lexington boys’ basketball team. 
The Wildcats were defeated 45-38 by 7th ranked Dutch Fork. 
Read more

The Revised:

Lexington loses heartbreaker to Dutch Fork
Gilbert boys win their 1st game of season

Lexington’s 9-game Region 5-5A winning streak ended Tuesday in Irmo as 7th ranked Dutch Fork won 45-38. 
Read more  Choosing emotional words like “heartbreaker” and naming 3 schools in the 2-sentence headline will draw readers who are fans of all 3 teams.
Of course, we can do this with our print stories, too.

Give it a try. With practice, it becomes a natural way for you to write.

For more tips like this, write JerryBellune@yahoo.com

5 questions all business owners must ask

How do you build a business that rocks?
Our friend Ruth King told us that Jim Howard who published her book, The Courage to be Profitable, asks business owners:
• What is your reason for being in business? Why are you doing this?
• What does your customer get out of it? Your reasons have to be big enough for your customer and you to care.
• What is your offer? What can you provide them that they want or need?
Their wants may be different from their needs. Many of us get what we want rather than what we need. People buy on wants and justify it with their need later.
• How do you tell them about the value of what you have to offer?
You can’t build it and they will come. You have to build it, market it and tell them why they should need or want it.
• What pain will you fix? What pleasure can you give? Without pain or a dream to motivate them, they won’t respond.
• How do you retain them as clients?
You must be loyal to them and look out for their interests if you want them to become loyal and trust you.
Long-term maintenance plans and extended warranties with multiple benefits can build their trust in you.
That’s how you build a business that rocks. We share such ideas in Maverick Entrepreneurs’ Million Dollar Strategies.
For a $20 personally autographed copy, contact us at 803-359-7633. You can get an electronic copy from Amazon by clicking here.
Copyright 2019, The Bellune Co., Inc.