What we can learn from weather forecasters

Good morning, fellow scribblers.

This may sound like a weird formula for
successful writing and communication but
think about what TV weather forecasters do:

In a 90-second forecast they:
1. Explain what will happen.
2. Compare it to what has happened.
3. Advise what you can do about it.
4. Use visual aids to help them.

90 seconds isn’t a lot of time.
It’s 225 words to the rest of us
That’s 9″ of type in many newspapers.
It’s 75% of a written letter page.
It’s 9 times longer than a classified ad.
And a classified ad must sell something.

TV forecasters know they talk to:
1. General viewers who don’t want much.
Will it be hot, cold or rainy tomorrow?
That’s all they’re interested in.
2. Weather freaks who want everything.
They are addicted to it.
3. Fellow experts and climatologists.
These people know if they fake it.
They must satisfy all 3 groups.

Let’s apply that to what we do.

Our readers are the ones who:
1. Want to know what happened.
How does it affect my life?
What should I do if it does?
2. Are news junkies.
They are addicted to news.
They read us cover to cover.
3. Those in the story.
They know what happened.
Or they think they do.
They are checking our accuracy.

Here’s a checklist you might
post beside your computer:

1. How does what I’m writing
affect or interest my readers?
Does it affect their taxes or costs?
Does it affect their family?
Does it affect their well being?

2. How does it affect those involved?
And what can they do about it?

3. Is it factually accurate?
Did we quote sources right?
If we paraphrase what they said,
does it reflect what they meant?

4, How can we illustrate this
with photos, maps, charts, etc.?
Will this improve our readers’
understanding or interest?

You will find tips like this
and others in our new
“Little Red Book of
Compelling Writing.”

Send me 75 to 100 words
about the value of these tips
and we will include them
in the book next spring.